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  • Deacon Richard Quistorff

Temptations in the Desert

On the first Sunday of Lent, the Gospel reading every year is about Jesus’ temptation in the desert. This event in the life of Jesus is reported in each of the Synoptic Gospels — Matthew, Mark, and Luke — but it is not found in John’s Gospel. This year we read Mark’s account of Jesus’s temptation.


Compared to the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, the details throughout Mark’s account are thin at best. This is evident in Mark’s account of Jesus’ temptation in the desert. Mark tells us only that Jesus was led into the desert by the Spirit and that for 40 days he was tempted by Satan. The Gospels of Matthew and Luke explain that Jesus fasted while in the desert, that Satan tempted him three different times, and that Jesus refused each one, at his refusal he was quoting Scripture. Only the Gospels of Matthew and Mark reports that angels ministered to Jesus at the end of his time in the desert.


In each of the Synoptic Gospels, the temptation of Jesus follows his baptism by John the Baptist. In Mark’s Gospel, we are told that Jesus went into the desert immediately after his baptism, led by the Spirit. Jesus’ public ministry in Galilee begins after his temptation in the desert. Mark’s Gospel makes a connection between the arrest of John the Baptist and the beginning of Jesus’ ministry. Jesus’ preaching about the Kingdom of God is pretty much aligned with the preaching of John the Baptist, but it is also something new. As Jesus announces it, the Kingdom of God is beginning; the time of the fulfillment of God’s promises is here.


The fact that Jesus spent 40 days in the desert is important. This recalls the 40 years that the Israelites wandered in the desert after being led from slavery in Egypt. The prophet Elijah also journeyed in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights, making his way to Mount Horeb, the mountain of God, where he was also attended to by an angel of the Lord. Remembering the significance of these events, we also set aside 40 days for the season of Lent.


In Mark’s Gospel, the desert marks the beginning of Jesus’ battle with Satan; the ultimate test will be in Jesus’ final hours on the cross. In a similar way, our Lenten observances are only a beginning, a preparation for and a strengthening of our ongoing struggle to resist the temptations we face in our lives. During Lent, we are led by the Holy Spirit to remember the vows of Baptism in which we promised to reject sin and to follow Jesus. Just as Jesus was ministered to by the angels, God also supports us in our struggle against sin and temptation. We succeed because Jesus conquered sin once and for all in his saving death on the cross.


May God Bless Us All …. Always!

Deacon Richard J. Quistorff


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